Showing posts tagged space.
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poof, boing!

Ask away!   Submitmarine   pastel meredith, the magic star

eastasianstudiestumbl:

laiika:

Women Watching Stars (1936) at the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo 

Ota Chou Women Observing Stars (1936). Ink on paper. 
This really compositionally interesting because you can see the women are in traditional kimono with the short bobbed hair. This telescope depicted here happens to be the one at the National Museum of Nature and Science. So all and all they are modern because of their hair and are learning/inquisitive science. All very modern but still reserves of the traditional because of their clothing. TALK ABOUT MIXED MESSAGING FOR THE MODERN WOMAN!!!  Though for the record most Japanese women by this time and especially after the 1924 quake would have had experiences with Western clothes and hairstyles. Fun Fact: This was made into a stamp in the 90’s.

eastasianstudiestumbl:

laiika:

Women Watching Stars (1936) at the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo 

Ota Chou Women Observing Stars (1936). Ink on paper. 

This really compositionally interesting because you can see the women are in traditional kimono with the short bobbed hair. This telescope depicted here happens to be the one at the National Museum of Nature and Science. So all and all they are modern because of their hair and are learning/inquisitive science. All very modern but still reserves of the traditional because of their clothing. TALK ABOUT MIXED MESSAGING FOR THE MODERN WOMAN!!!  Though for the record most Japanese women by this time and especially after the 1924 quake would have had experiences with Western clothes and hairstyles. Fun Fact: This was made into a stamp in the 90’s.

(via kill-claudio-vol-2)

— 1 year ago with 349 notes
#ladies of the world  #space  #fashion  #everything good 

spaceinperspective:

Vote! All the cool kids are doing it (and by cool kids I mean astronauts, of course).

NASA astronauts aboard the International Space Station have the option of voting in [today]’s presidential election from orbit, hundreds of miles above their nearest polling location.

Astronauts residing on the orbiting lab receive a digital version of their ballot, which is beamed up by Mission Control at the agency’s Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston. Filled-out ballots find their way back down to Earth along the same path.

"They send it back to Mission Control," said NASA spokesman Jay Bolden of JSC. "It’s a secure ballot that is then sent directly to the voting authorities."

This system was made possible by a 1997 bill passed by Texas legislators (nearly all NASA astronauts live in or around Houston). It was first used that same year by David Wolf, who happened to be aboard Russia’s Mir space station at the time.

— 1 year ago with 31 notes
#space 
bongwutsi:

mia-culpa:

jadelyn:

poptech:

All the American Flags On the Moon Are Now White

NASA has finally answered a long-standing question: all but one of the six American flags on the Moon are still standing up. Everyone is now proudly talking about it. The only problem is that they aren’t American flags anymore. They are all white.
So America f*ck yeah, right? Not quite. While the $5.50 nylon flags are still waving on the windless orb, they are not flags of the United States of America anymore. All Moon and material experts have no doubt about it: the flags are now completely white. If you leave a flag on Earth for 43 years, it would be almost completely faded. On the Moon, with no atmospheric protection whatsoever, that process happens a lot faster. The stars and stripes disappeared from our Moon flags quite some time ago.


There’s probably something poetic to be said here about failed nationalism, but I’ll just go with “The moon is not having any of your colonial-nationalist shit.”

Does this mean we surrendered to the moon?

Bolded mine because yeah.

bongwutsi:

mia-culpa:

jadelyn:

poptech:

All the American Flags On the Moon Are Now White

NASA has finally answered a long-standing question: all but one of the six American flags on the Moon are still standing up. Everyone is now proudly talking about it. The only problem is that they aren’t American flags anymore. They are all white.

So America f*ck yeah, right? Not quite. While the $5.50 nylon flags are still waving on the windless orb, they are not flags of the United States of America anymore. All Moon and material experts have no doubt about it: the flags are now completely white. If you leave a flag on Earth for 43 years, it would be almost completely faded. On the Moon, with no atmospheric protection whatsoever, that process happens a lot faster. The stars and stripes disappeared from our Moon flags quite some time ago.

There’s probably something poetic to be said here about failed nationalism, but I’ll just go with “The moon is not having any of your colonial-nationalist shit.”

Does this mean we surrendered to the moon?

Bolded mine because yeah.

(via m-azing)

— 2 years ago with 6372 notes
#space  #no boundaries 
One of the Expedition 30 crew members aboard the International Space Station took this nighttime photograph of much of the eastern (Atlantic) coast of the United States. Large metropolitan areas and other easily recognizable sites from the Virginia/Maryland/Washington, D.C. area spanning almost to Rhode Island are visible in the scene. Boston is just out of frame at right. Long Island and the Greater Metropolitan area of New York City are visible in the lower right quadrant. Large cities in Pennsylvania (Philadelphia and Pittsburgh) are near center.

One of the Expedition 30 crew members aboard the International Space Station took this nighttime photograph of much of the eastern (Atlantic) coast of the United States. Large metropolitan areas and other easily recognizable sites from the Virginia/Maryland/Washington, D.C. area spanning almost to Rhode Island are visible in the scene. Boston is just out of frame at right. Long Island and the Greater Metropolitan area of New York City are visible in the lower right quadrant. Large cities in Pennsylvania (Philadelphia and Pittsburgh) are near center.

— 2 years ago with 5 notes
#feelings about places  #space 
"Sally Ride was an American heroine, looked up to by a generation of science lovers ever since she made history by blasting into space on NASA’s shuttle Challenger on June 18, 1983. On that day she became the first American woman in space.

But her longtime partner, Dr. Tam E. O’Shaughnessy, is a very accomplished woman in her own right."
— 2 years ago with 425 notes
#ladies of the world  #space 

astroprojection:

Actual description of a show at the local planetarium:

Pluto and the Other Dwarfs: Smaller Objects of the Solar System guide sojourners on a quest to view the celestial orb as it hides, weeping over its stripped status as a planet, behind Saturn’s rings.

— 2 years ago with 6 notes
#space